All nodes in Dictatorship

 
 

Most of the time, when a person kills an intruder who breaks into his home, dressed in all black and screaming, the homeowner will avoid jail time. But what happens when the break-in was a no-knock SWAT raid, the intruder was a police officer, and the homeowner has a record?

 
 

President Obama has repeatedly championed his administration as the "most transparent in history," but much of the American media has concluded the opposite — that it's unrivaled in its zeal to block access to its own affairs, prosecute whistleblowers and surveil journalists for pursuing a sensitive story.

 
 

The FBI in Seattle created a fake news story on a bogus Seattle Times web page to plant software in the computer of a suspect in a series of bomb threats to Lacey’s Timberline High School in 2007, according to documents obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) in San Francisco.

The deception was publicized Monday when Christopher Soghoian, the principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union in Washington, D.C., revealed it on Twitter.

 
 

Federal law enforcement has increasingly used a key provision of the Patriot Act (pdf) to pry into people’s lives without having to tell them. This practice has been justified under the guise of counterterrorism, but government statistics show that less than 1% of all “sneak and peek” actions involve suspected terrorists.

 
 

Some legal cases do more than raise eyebrows — they push the legal envelope to change the law. Such is a federal case in Las Vegas now working its way through the courts. The question is whether federal agents can disrupt service to a house and then, masquerading as helpful technicians, gain entry to covertly search the premises in hopes of finding evidence that might later justify a search warrant.

The defendants in this case are not your everyday Americans. They are, in fact, Chinese gamblers who were staying in Las Vegas at Caesar's Palace earlier this year.

 
 

“ told by officers we couldn’t have a dance, under threat of being taken to jail with a felony of inciting a riot.”

A dance party in St. George, Utah was shut down over the weekend because the city will not allow people to dance without permits. However, “Heart of Dixie”, the company who organized the event was actually under the impression that they had all of the permits that they needed.

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