All nodes in Internet

 
 

TEHRAN (FNA)- A Yemeni hacking group announced that it has hacked the website, servers and archives of Saudi Arabia's Foreign, Interior and Defense ministries and released thousands of top secret documents from the identity and contact addresses of the country's spies to the most confidential correspondence of Riyadh officials in the last several decades.

 
 

The National Security Agency and its closest allies planned to hijack data links to Google and Samsung app stores to infect smartphones with spyware, a top-secret document reveals.

The surveillance project was launched by a joint electronic eavesdropping unit called the Network Tradecraft Advancement Team, which includes spies from each of the countries in the “Five Eyes” alliance — the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia.

 
 

WASHINGTON (CBS DC) — Former National Security Agency contractor and government surveillance whistleblower Edward Snowden insists he is “not a hero, not a traitor” and that his leaks were a “moral obligation” and not done in self-interest.
Speaking last Friday via videoconference at Stanford University for “The 2015 Symbolic Systems Distinguished Speaker” series, Snowden addressed moral dilemmas on whistleblowing and his reasons for leaking the government program information before fleeing to Hong Kong, and later Russia.

 
 

Sen. Ron Wyden: “Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?”

James Clapper: “No, sir.”

Wyden: “It does not?”

Clapper: “Not wittingly. There are cases where they could inadvertently perhaps collect, but not wittingly.”

Of course, it has become immensely clear since then that Clapper’s claim was blatantly false, and the NSA does exactly what Clapper said it doesn’t.

So how does Clapper account for this discrepancy? He claims he totally forgot about that whole mass surveillance thing:

 
 

It was supposed to be the declawing of America’s biggest spy service. But “what no one wants to say out loud is that this is a big win for the NSA,” one former top spook says.
Civil libertarians and privacy advocates were applauding yesterday after the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed legislation to stop the National Security Agency from collecting Americans’ phone records. But they’d best not break out the bubbly.

 
 

A decision last week about NSA spying by a panel of judges on the United States Court of Appeals in New York City sent shock waves through the government. The court ruled that a section of the Patriot Act that is due to expire at the end of this month and on which the government has relied as a basis for its bulk acquisition of telephone data in the past 14 years does not authorize that acquisition. This may sound like legal mumbo jumbo, but it goes to the heart of the relationship between the people and their government in a free society. Here is the backstory and the latest.

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