All nodes in Elections

 
 

THERE is a very real chance that the presidential election in 2016 will pit Jeb Bush against Hillary Clinton. According to oddsmakers, this is the likeliest outcome.

Many Americans are uncomfortable with the idea that two families could dominate the presidency that way. Whether or not you like one of the candidates, it just doesn’t feel right, in part because a second Bush-Clinton election makes a mockery of our self-identification as a democratic meritocracy.

 
 

President Obama has suggested that compulsory voting could be a good idea. "Other countries have mandatory voting," said the president, Australia being the most prominent example. "It would be transformative if everybody voted — that would counteract money more than anything," he continued.

The president is wrong. Compulsory voting is not just unwise, it is unconstitutional.

 
 

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) raised expectations among conservatives in a speech to CPAC on Friday when he promised he will soon unveil a blockbuster new economic proposal.

“In the coming weeks, I will propose the largest tax cut in American history,” Paul said. “I propose we cut everyone’s taxes, from the richest to the poorest.”

Paul raised expectations even further when he claimed that his proposal “will also cut spending and balance the budget in just five years.”

 
 

NATIONAL HARBOR, Maryland — Perhaps in fear that he didn’t have enough backers willing to show up on their own, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s campaign organized to bus supporters to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) to cheer during his appearance on stage and vote for him in the straw poll.

The New York Times’ Jonathan Martin writes that Bush brought people in from Washington, D.C.: “Mr. Bush’s supporters organized caravans of his Washington backers to attend his speech, and they cheered whenever anyone else booed,” Martin wrote.

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